Upton dress progress!

Holiday weekends can be lifesavers when it comes to making steady progress on projects. This Labor Day weekend I spent mostly in my sewing room working on my hand-printed Upton dress, and I made great progress. Which is good, because my friend’s wedding is next Sunday. Eek!

I did quite a bit of hand basting, rather unexpectedly. I hand basted all the bodice darts, because I suck at aligning dart legs without this special ladder basting I learned from Threads magazine. This technique works perfectly, and I use it every time I have to sew a dart.

 

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Hand basting darts is tedious. But it works every time!

Assembling the bodice and the lining went pretty quickly after I got all 16–yes 16 (8 for the lining, 8 for the shell)–darts sewn. I’m not sure whether I like the method the Upton pattern uses for preventing the lining from rolling to the outside better than I like understitching, but it certainly was faster and it seems to do the trick just fine. The method, in case you’re wondering, is simply trimming the neckline and armscyes on the bodice lining by 1/16 inch so that the lining is a tad smaller in those spots and the outer shell rolls to the inside a bit.

 

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You can see along the back neckline how the shell rolls just slightly to the inside because the lining is a smidge smaller. Loving that custom label, especially how it coordinates with my dress!

 

Sewing the side seams of the front and back together went okay, but could have been better. I’m pretty sure it’s my fault that the pattern is longer through the front along the side seam–by about 1/8 inch–because I graded out and lengthened the front a bit. That doesn’t sound like a lot of excess, but easing it into the back side seam, especially on the lining, was a pain. AND it made getting the waistband seams to align properly much harder, even though I basted the side seams before sewing! I had to redo the first side seam I sewed 3 times before the waistband seams aligned even close to properly. Apparently I suck at this, too. But the second side seam went much better and worked the first time. At least I learn.

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Baste, baste, baste. It’s time-consuming, but so is ripping out seams and redoing them.

 

With the bodice prepped as far as the instructions have it to this point, I started on the skirt.

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Skirt front section and its lining pleated together.

 

I made some additions here. The pattern is for an unlined skirt, but I wanted a bit of extra floof; plus I prefer lined skirts, especially if they’re full. I used the same cotton lawn as for the bodice lining. I pleated the lining and shell skirt sections together, after basting along the upper edges. I left about 1 inch free at the side seams, because the shell and lining side seams will be sewn separately to place the pockets between the layers. Once all 3 skirt sections were pleated, I sewed the lining side seams. Next the shell side seams and pockets will be sewn, then I’ll baste the final bit of shell and lining waistline together, and it’ll be ready to be set into the bodice.

Thank goodness I still have 4 days to work on this dress!

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